Home








View of the main entry

The Spadina Quay Wetlands suffered from a typical urban wetland restoration problem: the open-water marsh terrestrial and aquatic plant communities appeared weedy and unkempt, with the border between wetland and street appearing decidedly un-urban. As a site that is highly diverse, productive and active, the challenge was to create an edge that could mediate between the sidewalk and the wetland by providing seating and other urban amenities, while also foregrounding the wetland’s structure as a legitimate form of urban park. The solution is an edging system comprised of a kit of parts that may be used in tandem on a series of restoration projects – for which Spadina Quay would be the pilot initiative.

The kit includes raised wood timbers on weathering steel legs that mark the urban edge of the site and perforated wood posts. In addition to supplying extensive seating close to the vegetation, the timber benches provide a definitive yet subtle border perimeter. The new path leads to a stone look-out embedded in the wetland. The post-holes offer a playful means of focusing one’s attention on the wetlands – typically overlooked planting and birdlife.



View from the east wavedeck

View from the east wavedeck



View of the look-out

Children enjoying the stone look-out nestled amongst the plants



View of the entry from the street

The edge mediates between the sidewalk and the wetland



Entrance to the wetland

The entrance to the wetland



Viewing posts and wetland identification

Viewing posts and wetland identification



View from the southeast

View from the southeast



View through a viewing post

Bird in mid-flight is captured through the frame of the viewing post



project credits >